Have you tried buying shoes from Brogaa

Buying shoes without trying them on - how do you know they will be comfortable?

imme

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
299
United States
MN
Twin Cities
I've always had difficulty buying shoes - even in-store - just because I find that most shoes are not comfortable (not to mention that sizes and shapes/cuts may also vary greatly between brands and lines). I see people buying shoes online all the time (Zappos, eBay, AAAC, etc), but can't understand how. How do you know that the shoes you buy will be comfortable without trying them on (assuming that both you and the seller/retailer have accurate foot measurements)?
744
United States
California
Los angeles
I've always had difficulty buying shoes - even in-store - just because I find that most shoes are not comfortable (not to mention that sizes and shapes/cuts may also vary greatly between brands and lines). I see people buying shoes online all the time (Zappos, eBay, AAAC, etc), but can't understand how. How do you know that the shoes you buy will be comfortable without trying them on (assuming that both you and the seller/retailer have accurate foot measurements)?
Well, you kind of don't know until you try them. But once you know your correct size, and if you have experience with a certain brand, there is a relative certainty they're going to be comfortable.

I must say I have tricky feet to fit, but have never found that "most shoes are uncomfortable" as you mention. What kind of shoes have you found uncomfortable in particular? You say "most" but that's pretty broad. Johnston & Murphy, Allen Edmonds, Cole Haan, Kenneth Cole? Or do you just mean any dress style shoes?

Are you mostly used to wearing athletic shoes?
9,631
United States
Michigan
Lansing
If you have an odd size foot, (barring being able to afford bespoke) or flat feet, no shoe would probably feel comfortable. (Shoes that don't fit well are awful.)

I wonder if that is what the OP is getting at.
744
United States
California
Los angeles
If you have an odd size foot, (barring being able to afford bespoke) or flat feet, no shoe would probably feel comfortable. (Shoes that don't fit well are awful.)

I wonder if that is what the OP is getting at.
Perhaps so. I have large flat feet and a set of orthotics really works for me.
The only way I know that mail order shoes will be comfortable is to order them custom made from Russell's. I've learned not to order shoes online from anyone else. Try. Them. On. First!
It's a crapshoot for me. I buy within my range and hope for the best. Probably half of the shoes end up re-sold on ebay. If I buy new, it's Zappos or Amazon for their amazing return policies.

Why do you find so many shoes uncomfortable?

imme

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
299
United States
MN
Twin Cities
Well, you kind of don't know until you try them. But once you know your correct size, and if you have experience with a certain brand, there is a relative certainty they're going to be comfortable.

I must say I have tricky feet to fit, but have never found that "most shoes are uncomfortable" as you mention. What kind of shoes have you found uncomfortable in particular? You say "most" but that's pretty broad. Johnston & Murphy, Allen Edmonds, Cole Haan, Kenneth Cole? Or do you just mean any dress style shoes?

Are you mostly used to wearing athletic shoes?
Sorry, "most" was a sweeping generalization. Admittedly, I don't have much experience with trying on dress shoes. Beyond the pair of Florsheim I purchased along with a bespoke suit ~7 years ago (but have worn all of thrice because I was always worried about scratching/damaging my "nice" shoes), I don't know that I've ever tried on any of the "higher end" shoes you mentioned.

For the past several years, I've only worn runners when I go out in the evenings (unless I'm coming from work, in which case I'm still wearing dress shoes). I actually wear dress shoes every day. Or, rather, I wear black shoes every day. My default up until recently was a pair of black Rockport walking shoes. As of late, it is a pair of black Dr. Comfort FlexOA; I realize the name is ridiculous, but they're very comfortable on busy days that have me walking/running around the entire time. If I feel like dressing up more, I'll wear my black Rockport dress shoes. But, I only wear them on days I don't expect to be walking around as much; they're comfortable...right up until they're not and I notice that my little toe gets more sore every time it rubs against the side...

I struggle to balance comfort, appearance, and price when it comes to shoes (not to mention how easy it would be to remove blood and other assorted body fluids that may or may not come into contact with the shoes on a daily basis).

ETA: I don't have flat feet, but I don't have a large arch, either. The other part of it is that I also don't have narrow feet. One reason many shoes that should fit me length-wise are uncomfortable is that they are too narrow - either in the area of the arch or toes - or too loose in the heel area.

Faust

Active Member with Corp. Privileges
124
United States
North Carolina
Charlotte
I've had very good luck ordering from the AE Shoebank. First, find out your size, then order. It can be trial and error.
Sounds like you actually need some Alden's. They're made on a combination last. So you can buy something that fits wide in the toe box and narrow at the heel. They're pricey, but well worth it.
6,586
United States
New Jersey
Ocean
I don't see why you percieve a problem. IF purchased from a site with liberal return policies, such as AE, or Zappos the only difficulty is a trip to the UPS store and a few dollars in shipping. Probably about what you'd spend on gas and parking going to the store. Then there is the time savings and convenience of trying them on at home. Just make sure to stay on the carpeting so you don't mar the soles.
It's no different from ordering other clothes online. The fit between manufacturers and different models is always a crapshoot. With clothes you have the otion of returning them or taking them to the tailor. With shoes you just return them and order the correct size.

BTW Woodlore sells a shoe stretcher that works well for relieving small pressure points.

Also shaving down callouses and corns is a vital but oft overlooked necessity. If diabetic or having neuropathy this should be performed by a Podiatrist on a regular basis.

Deals/Steals