How do you say however in Portuguese

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Reason 4: To visit Brazil (and maybe even stay)\

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But all work and no play would be a waste of your newly-acquired language skills. You know that picture you have in your mind when you close your eyes and think of a tropical paradise? Yeah, that picture was probably taken in Brazil.\

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Anyone can go to Brazil and sit on one of its world-class beaches for a week (there are 7,000 km of beaches, so you certainly won’t get bored), but would you rather hang in a \boteco\, drinking \cervejas estupidamente geladas\ with your new Brazilian friends until the sun comes up? Speaking at least some basic Portuguese will allow you to access the real culture that is out of reach to monolingual tourists. And as we pointed out in reason #3, plenty of visitors to Brazil aren’t satisfied by a short stay. The opportunities to live and work in Brazil grow along with its booming economy.\

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Reason 5: It’s your gateway to all the other Romance languages\

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Understanding Portuguese has a knock-on effect when starting to learn any other Romance language like Spanish, Italian, French and Romanian. Knowledge of one makes it much easier to pick up any of the others, since they all evolved from Latin and still share grammar and syntax, and have lots of similar vocabulary.\

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To put it another way, can you think of one good reason \not\ to learn Portuguese?\

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Want to finally learn a foreign language, but can’t decide which one? Besides the obvious benefits that learning any language brings, here are our top 5 reasons to learn Portuguese.\

John-Erik was born in Los Angeles and grew up in a suburb named after Tarzan (yes, really). He's lived in Berlin since 2009 and has been Babbel Magazine's managing editor since 2015. Most of his free time is taken up by unhealthy obsessions with science fiction, tabletop games and the Dodgers.\

John-Erik was born in Los Angeles and grew up in a suburb named after Tarzan (yes, really). He's lived in Berlin since 2009 and has been Babbel Magazine's managing editor since 2015. Most of his free time is taken up by unhealthy obsessions with science fiction, tabletop games and the Dodgers.\

\n","de":"\

John-Erik Jordan kommt ursprünglich aus Los Angeles, Kalifornien. Er studierte Kunst an der Cooper Union in New York und arbeitete als Videoeditor in LA, bevor er sich dem Schreiben widmete. Seit 2009 lebt er in Berlin und hat unter anderem für PLAYBerlin, Hebbel am Ufer und verschiedene Online-Publikationen geschrieben. Seit 2014 schreibt er bei Babbel über Sprachen.\

\n","fr":"\

John-Erik Jordan est originaire de Los Angeles, Californie. Il a fait des études d'arts à la Cooper Union à New York puis a travaillé comme monteur à L.A. avant de se tourner vers l'écriture. Depuis qu'il est venu habiter à Berlin en 2009, il écrit pour PLAYBerlin, HAU (Hebbel am Ufer) et diverses autres publications. Il est rédacteur de Babbel depuis 2014.\

\n","it":"\

John-Erik Jordan è nato a Los Angeles, California. Dopo aver studiato arte alla Cooper Union di New York ha lavorato come tecnico del montaggio a Los Angeles, per poi dedicarsi alla scrittura. Da quando si è trasferito a Berlino nel 2009 ha scritto per PLAYBerlin, Hebbel-am-Ufer e altre pubblicazioni online. Dal 2014 scrive anche articoli sulle lingue per Babbel.\

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John-Erik Jordan é natural de Los Angeles, Califórnia. O autor estudou artes na Cooper Union em Nova Iorque e trabalhou como editor de vídeo em LA antes de se dedicar à literatura. Desde que se mudou para Berlim, em 2009, ele escreve para PLAYBerlin, Hebbel-am-Ufer e outras publicações on-line. Desde 2014, ele escreve para a Babbel sobre idiomas e seus desafios.\

\n","pl":"\

John-Erik urodził się w Los Angeles i dorastał na przedmieściach w dzielnicy Tarzana (nazwanej tak – to nie żart! – na cześć króla dżungli). Od 2009 r. mieszka w Berlinie, a od 2015 r. jest redaktorem prowadzącym Magazynu Babbel. W wolnym czasie oddaje się swoim pasjom: science fiction, planszówkom oraz rozgrywkom baseballowej drużyny LA Dodgers.\

\n","es":"\

John-Erik nació en Los Ángeles, California. Estudió arte en The Cooper Union en Nueva York y trabajó como realizador de vídeo en Los Ángeles antes de dedicarse a escribir. Desde que se mudó a Berlín en 2009, escribe para PLAYBerlin, Hebbel-am-Ufer y otras publicaciones online. Desde 2014 escribe también sobre aprendizaje de idiomas para Babbel.\

\n","sv":"\

John-Erik Jordan kommer från Los Angeles, Kalifornien. Han läste konst på The Cooper Union i New York och jobbade som videoredigerare i Los Angeles innan han började fokusera på skrivandet. Sedan flytten till Berlin 2009 har John-Erik skrivit för bland annat PLAYBerlin, Hebbel-am-Ufer Theater och olika onlinepublikationer. För Babbel Magazine har han skrivit om språk sedan 2014.\

Learning a language isn’t always easy, but it can become easier if you keep in mind these tricks on \how\ to learn. Knowing that different languages require different approaches is a good place to start. For an English native speaker, for example, learning German and learning Japanese will be two completely different experiences. Because of its closeness and common origins with English, learning German should, in theory, be easier.\

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Here are a few tips for those of you who want to learn a language similar to your mother tongue. Like most things, there are pros and cons to learning a similar language, but even the difficulties can be used to your advantage.\

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1. Take advantage of the similar stems\

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\nMany important words will have similar stems in languages close to each other. The stem is the part of the word to which prefixes and suffixes are attached – with one stem, is possible to build several different words. In English, for example, “friend” is the stem for “friendship”, “friendly”, and “to befriend”, among many other words.\

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The German word “Freund” is pretty similar to its English counterpart, but the words derived from it may be a bit harder to catch: “Freundschaft” (friendship), “freundlich” (friendly), and “sich anfreunden” (to befriend).\

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For an English native speaker learning German, it’ll be much easier to understand how the words are built and to memorize the German affixes than to simply learn every word by heart.\

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2. Know who your friends are (and separate the true from the false)\

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\nThe fact that similar languages have many words in common is possibly the greatest advantage of learning a language close to your own. Continuing with the example of English and German, let’s compare a few basic words: mother/Mutter, father/Vater, water/Wasser, three/drei, beer/Bier, fish/Fisch, butter/Butter, warm/warm… the list of the so-called true friends is huge.\

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With Portuguese and Spanish, the lexical similarity is even bigger. A few examples: cerveja/cerveza (beer), dois/dos (two), comer/comer (to eat), pronunciar/pronunciar (to pronounce). There are so many similarities that many people in Brazil think they can speak Spanish without ever having studied it, though this isn’t exactly true.\

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When it comes to languages, however, not every friend is a true friend. You have to learn to separate the true friends (words that look alike and have similar meanings) from the false friends (words that look alike or even have identical spellings but have completely different meanings depending on the language).\

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A classic example of a German/English false friend is the word “gift”. If you receive a “gift” from an English speaker, you’ll most definitely be happy about it. But if it comes from a German, it’s better not to take it, since “das Gift” means “poison” in Goethe’s language.\

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This can cause a lot of confusion,but only if you let that happen. The fact that a seemingly familiar word can mean something completely different in another language may be so funny and absurd that it will be easy to remember it.\

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The first thing I learned about Spanish is one of the most famous false friends that it has with Brazilian Portuguese: “sobrenome” (PT-BR: last name), is equivalent to “apellido” (ES: last name), whereas “apelido” (PT-BR: nickname) can be translated in Spanish as “sobrenombre” (ES: nickname, other possible translations are “mote” and “apodo”). This is so strange (and amazing) that I never forgot it after learning it for the first time.\

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3. Take advantage of similar grammar structures\

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\nGrammar varies according to the language, but there are still a few structures that will make some foreign languages sound much more familiar to you than others.\

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Let’s look at word order in composite nouns, for example. In English and German, the order is the same.\

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\English:\ toothpaste\

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\German:\ Zahnpasta\

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In Portuguese and Spanish, the order of nouns is flipped so that “toothpaste” is literally “paste of teeth.”\

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\Portuguese:\ pasta de dente\

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\Spanish:\ pasta de dientes\

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Something similar occurs with the position of adjectives: in English and German, they come before the noun. In Spanish and Portuguese, they generally come after.\

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\English:\ the \blue\ sky\

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\German:\ der \blaue\ Himmel\

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\Portuguese:\ o céu \azul\\

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\Spanish:\ el cielo \azul\\

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English phrasal verbs and German separable verbs are another example of similar grammatical structures. They are not exactly the same thing, but both work in a similar way: a particle is used to modify the verb, giving it a whole new meaning.\

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In English, for example, “blow” can mean “explode” when you add an “up” after it. In German, “to say” (sagen) becomes “to cancel” by adding an “ab” to the beginning. It is not necessary to be a native speaker of these languages to understand these structures, but it’ll certainly help.\

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4. Take advantage of similar sounds\

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\nPart of speaking a language is knowing how to pronounce it. The sounds used in a language — or, “phonemes” — vary, but, just like some vocabulary and grammar, they will be more similar in closer languages.\

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For an English native speaker, German phonemes will be easier to understand — and replicate — than those in Chinese. For a Portuguese native speaker, trying to repeat something in Spanish will be easier than repeating something in German.\

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Of course there are going to be exceptions, since even languages close to each other may have very different sounds. Just as Spanish native speakers find it hard to pronounce the nasal sounds characteristic of Portuguese, it is not especially easy for Brits and Americans to pronounce words like Streichholzschächtelchen (check out other German words that are tricky to pronounce and tips to say them correctly here).\

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But, generally speaking, linguistic closeness does make pronunciation much easier.\

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5. Train your brain to deduce things from context\

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\nSo you’ve completed your first lessons, you already understand the language reasonably well (after all, it is similar to your own) and it’s finally time to watch a movie without subtitles (or with subtitles in the original language). Everything is going very well until a few words come up that you haven’t learned yet. Don’t panic!\

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Several things can help you understand what these words mean, such as the context, facial expressions and, of course, thinking whether is sounds similar to something in your own language. Deducing the meaning of an unknown word will be easier when the context is familiar. You can often get the main idea of what someone is saying, even without understanding every single word.\

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6. Push yourself\

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\nBy choosing to learn a language similar to yours, you should be able to see progress more quickly than if you had chosen something more different. But that shouldn’t be an excuse to practice less! On the contrary: take advantage of this fact to achieve your language-learning goals faster.\

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Keep setting new challenges for yourself, but make sure that they are realistic. Smaller goals usually work better: it is better to learn how to order in a restaurant in one week than trying to become conversational in one month, for example. Overly ambitious objectives are usually too vague and unrealistic, and you’ll just end up frustrated.\

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Try using these tips and you’ll soon realize that the complicated-looking cousins of your mother tongue can be much easier to learn than you expected.\

\n","excerpt":"\

Some languages have a lot in common. Use these shortcuts to your advantage when learning a language similar to your mother tongue.\

Gabriel Mestieri was born and raised in Sao Paulo, Brazil, where he studied Journalism and History and worked at several news and media outlets. After visiting Berlin and falling in love with the city, he chose it to make it his home in 2014. His main interests are learning languages and discovering new music styles.\

Gabriel Mestieri was born and raised in Sao Paulo, Brazil, where he studied Journalism and History and worked at several news and media outlets. After visiting Berlin and falling in love with the city, he chose it to make it his home in 2014. His main interests are learning languages and discovering new music styles.\

\n","de":"\

Gabriel Mestieri ist in São Paulo, Brasilien, geboren und aufgewachsen. Er hat Journalismus und Geschichte studiert und bei verschiedenen Pressekanälen gearbeitet. Bei einem Besuch nach Berlin verliebte er sich in die Stadt und ist schließlich 2014 nach Deutschland gezogen. Seine Hauptinteressen sind, Sprachen zu lernen und neue Musikstile zu entdecken. \Folge ihm\ auf Twitter.\

\n","fr":"\

Gabriel Mestieri est né à São Paulo, au Brésil. Il a fait des études d'histoire et de journalisme et a travaillé pour différents médias. Lors d'un voyage en Allemagne, il est tombé amoureux de Berlin et est venu s'y installer en 2014. Il se passionne pour les langues étrangères et aime découvrir de nouveaux courants musicaux. \Suivez-moi\ sur Twitter.\

\n","it":"\

Gabriel Mestieri è nato e cresciuto a San Paolo, in Brasile, dove ha studiato giornalismo e storia e ha lavorato per diversi magazine, sia online che cartacei. Dopo aver visitato Berlino e essersene innamorato, ha deciso di trasferirvisi nel 2014. Adora scoprire nuovi stili musicali e tutto quello che riguarda l'apprendimento delle lingue.\

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\Seguitelo\ su Twitter.\

\n","pt":"\

Gabriel Mestieri nasceu e cresceu em São Paulo, onde estudou Jornalismo e História e trabalhou em diferentes veículos de comunicação. Após visitar Berlim e se apaixonar pela cidade, escolheu-a como sua nova casa em 2014. Seus principais interesses são aprender idiomas e descobrir novos tipos de música. \Siga-me\ no Twitter.\

\n","pl":"\

\Gabriel Mestieri urodził się i wychował w São Paulo w Brazylii. W rodzinnym mieście studiował dziennikarstwo i historię, pracował także w różnych agencjach informacyjnych. W 2014 roku podjął decyzję o przeprowadzce do Berlina \\–\\ z miłości do miasta. Lubi uczyć się języków i odkrywać nowe style muzyczne.\\

\n","es":"\

Gabriel nació y creció en São Paulo, Brasil. Allí estudió periodismo e historia y trabajó en diferentes medios de comunicación. Después de visitar Berlín y enamorarse de la ciudad, la eligió como su nueva casa en 2014. Sus principales intereses son aprender idiomas y descubrir nuevos tipos de música.\

Interest in Brazil and the Portuguese language has skyrocketed over the past few years. With major events such as the 2014 World Cup and the Games taking place in Brazil this summer, more people than ever before are either learning Portuguese, or simply trying to get to know more about the 6th largest language in the world (in terms of native speakers).\

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In the video above, 7 non-native Portuguese speakers from 7 different countries (some already fluent in Portuguese, others not so much) give everything they’ve got to pronounce some tricky words in Portuguese.\

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Think you could do better? To help you master the art of Portuguese pronunciation, here are a few tips on conquering those pesky tongue-twisting Portuguese words.\

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1. Exceção (exception)\

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\xc\ – The letter “x” can be a big problem for people learning Portuguese. There are 5 different ways of pronouncing it, and the rules governing when to use each pronunciation have so many exceptions that it’s better not to bother. We recommend consulting a dictionary with phonetic transcriptions. For example, when “x” is combined with “c,” it sounds like “s” as in “soap.”\

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\ç\ – This symbol under the “c” is called cedilla (or “cedilha,” in Portuguese) and it changes the way the “c” is pronounced in languages like Portuguese, French and Catalan. In some languages, like Turkish and Kurdish, it exists as a proper letter in its own right — the “Ꝣ.” In Portuguese, it’s pronounced like an “s” as in “Saturday.”\

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\ão\ – This one is a real nightmare for non-native Portuguese speakers. There is no exact match for it in the English language, but if you think of “oun” being spoken in a very nasal way you’re getting close. The symbol on top of the “a” is called tilde (also “til” in Portuguese), and indicates that the vowel is pronounced nasally.\

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2. Amanhã (tomorrow)\

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\nh\ – Another sound with no real equivalent in English, it is pronounced in a similar way as “ny” in “Enya.”\

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\ã\ – Also pronounced nasally, this is somewhat similar to “an.”\

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3. Lagartixa (tropical house gecko)\

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\x\ – As explained above, the “x” in Portuguese can be pronounced in 5 different ways. Here, it is pronounced in the same way as the “sh” in “shocked.”\

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4. Trocadilho (word pun)\

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\lh\ – The “h” after the “l” is pronounced like a very short “i.”\

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5. Cabeleireiro (hairdresser)\

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\ei\ – Pronounced like the “ay” in “lay.” This sound is repeated for both the “lei” and “rei” parts of this word.\

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\r\ – When placed between two vowels, the “r” makes a sound similar to a “d”. Say repeatedly “dadadada.” The “d” becomes softer and softer until you naturally start hearing “dadararara.” Ta-da!\

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6. Paralelepípedo (paving stone, parallelepiped)\

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It may have simple phonemes, but the real difficulty of this word lies in its repeated switching of vowels and consonants. The stressed syllable, as the acute accent indicates, is on “pí.”\

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7. Otorrinolaringologista (otolaryngologist)\

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The main issue here of course is the size of the word, but let’s take a look at a few of the sounds in particular:\

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\rr\ – Pronounced the same way as the “h” in “house,” this rule also applies to a single “r” if it’s placed at the beginning of a word. So, if you’d like to pronounce the name of the host city of the 2016 Olympics like an authentic Brazilian, you should say something like “Hio de Janeido.”\

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\go\ – When placed before the vowels “o,” “a” and “u,” the “g” in Portuguese sounds like the “g” in the words “gorilla,” “garlic” and “gun.”\

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\gi\ – When it comes before the vowels “e” and “i,” the “g” has a sound that can be described as something between the “g” in “gigolo” and the “sh” in “she.” This soft “g” is also similar to the way the “s” is pronounced in “unusual.”\

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\n","excerpt":"\

7 foreigners from 7 countries tried their best to pronounce tricky Portuguese words. See how they got on, and pick up some useful pronunciation tips.\

Gabriel Mestieri was born and raised in Sao Paulo, Brazil, where he studied Journalism and History and worked at several news and media outlets. After visiting Berlin and falling in love with the city, he chose it to make it his home in 2014. His main interests are learning languages and discovering new music styles.\

Gabriel Mestieri was born and raised in Sao Paulo, Brazil, where he studied Journalism and History and worked at several news and media outlets. After visiting Berlin and falling in love with the city, he chose it to make it his home in 2014. His main interests are learning languages and discovering new music styles.\

\n","de":"\

Gabriel Mestieri ist in São Paulo, Brasilien, geboren und aufgewachsen. Er hat Journalismus und Geschichte studiert und bei verschiedenen Pressekanälen gearbeitet. Bei einem Besuch nach Berlin verliebte er sich in die Stadt und ist schließlich 2014 nach Deutschland gezogen. Seine Hauptinteressen sind, Sprachen zu lernen und neue Musikstile zu entdecken. \Folge ihm\ auf Twitter.\

\n","fr":"\

Gabriel Mestieri est né à São Paulo, au Brésil. Il a fait des études d'histoire et de journalisme et a travaillé pour différents médias. Lors d'un voyage en Allemagne, il est tombé amoureux de Berlin et est venu s'y installer en 2014. Il se passionne pour les langues étrangères et aime découvrir de nouveaux courants musicaux. \Suivez-moi\ sur Twitter.\

\n","it":"\

Gabriel Mestieri è nato e cresciuto a San Paolo, in Brasile, dove ha studiato giornalismo e storia e ha lavorato per diversi magazine, sia online che cartacei. Dopo aver visitato Berlino e essersene innamorato, ha deciso di trasferirvisi nel 2014. Adora scoprire nuovi stili musicali e tutto quello che riguarda l'apprendimento delle lingue.\

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\Seguitelo\ su Twitter.\

\n","pt":"\

Gabriel Mestieri nasceu e cresceu em São Paulo, onde estudou Jornalismo e História e trabalhou em diferentes veículos de comunicação. Após visitar Berlim e se apaixonar pela cidade, escolheu-a como sua nova casa em 2014. Seus principais interesses são aprender idiomas e descobrir novos tipos de música. \Siga-me\ no Twitter.\

\n","pl":"\

\Gabriel Mestieri urodził się i wychował w São Paulo w Brazylii. W rodzinnym mieście studiował dziennikarstwo i historię, pracował także w różnych agencjach informacyjnych. W 2014 roku podjął decyzję o przeprowadzce do Berlina \\–\\ z miłości do miasta. Lubi uczyć się języków i odkrywać nowe style muzyczne.\\

\n","es":"\

Gabriel nació y creció en São Paulo, Brasil. Allí estudió periodismo e historia y trabajó en diferentes medios de comunicación. Después de visitar Berlín y enamorarse de la ciudad, la eligió como su nueva casa en 2014. Sus principales intereses son aprender idiomas y descubrir nuevos tipos de música.\

When the opportunity for an impromptu trip to Rio de Janeiro came my way, I wasn’t about to turn it down.\

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\Wait, but the entire trip will be filmed? People all over the world will witness my ignorant questions, embarrassing tourist faux pas and stupid language mistakes I commit while I’m on vacation?\\

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Well… there’s no such thing as a free lunch. Brazil here I come!\

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Praia do Leme\

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My first stop is Rio’s center of public life — the beach! Praia do Leme is a postcard-perfect vision of a tropical vacation: fine white sand, palm trees, stands selling coconut water straight from the fruit. Oh, and lots of people playing sports (but I mean \seriously\ playing sports). Jeez, is everyone on this beach a professional athlete? The clichés about Brazilian beach-bods should have prepared me, but dang — these people are fit (and I am \so\ not).\

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I know I can’t stand on the sidelines all day, so I try to join in. A Muay Thai instructor lets me audit his class in the shade of some palms (I don’t know how to ask in Portuguese, but luckily “fight club” proves to be a universal phrase). Doing reps is the perfect opportunity to learn numbers in Portuguese, so now I can count to ten (that should come in handy later). I also learn how to say “thank you” (\obrigado\). Nearby, some people are training for a sport I never knew existed, \futevôlei\, a cross between soccer (\futebol\) and volleyball (\voleibol\) that was invented in Rio. It looks difficult, but I give it a go. Training becomes a chance to learn some useful verbs, like \chutar\ (“to kick”), and the Portuguese words for body parts, but I’m a hopeless \futevôlei\ player: I’m not very good at hitting the ball with my \cabeça\, \braço\, \peito\… to be honest, not with my \pés\ either).\

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Arpoador\

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It’s tempting to believe that you can get by anywhere in the world only speaking English, but in Brazil, at least, that is simply not true. Still, I’m discovering that most people are very approachable and chatty in Rio — even when we don’t have a language in common! I’ve already found myself in more than one long conversation where I speak English the whole time and my conversation partner speaks Portuguese the whole time. All of my gestures (and the t-shirt covered in icons) can help to get a point across, but I mostly have to thank the patience and good will of the people who take the time to talk to me.\

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I’m picking up words sporadically — \\boteco, gelada, feijoada\\ — but I luck out when I’m offered an impromptu language lesson by some young ladies I meet at Arpoador (a popular sunset-viewing spot in Ipanema). Thanks to them, I now know that residents of Rio are called \cariocas\, the yummy purple goo I’ve been eating (\açai\) is made from Amazonian berries, and (I know I’m getting ahead of myself here) how to invite someone to dance: \Você quer dançar comigo?\, or the more polite: \Você gostaria de dançar comigo?\\

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Next stop: Finding a place to dance samba in the lively Lapa district. Uh-oh, maybe I should have asked for a samba lesson first: \Você poderia me ensinar a sambar?\\

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Lapa\

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