How safe is Kips Bay Manhattan

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04-04-2009, 05:10 PM
 
508 posts, read 1,967,013 times
I have a friend who isn't from Manhattan but is looking to relocate to this area in Manhattan. She wanted to know what the vibe was like in the area, as far as residents. While I'm familiar with the area, I have never lived in this area and I don't want to tell her the wrong thing.

We've already heard some conflicting things. Some have said the area is great, while others have said that the vibe was "weird."

Any thoughts? I wanted to know the real deal from my fellow City Data posters. TIA.
04-04-2009, 05:20 PM
 
7,079 posts, read 34,950,962 times
It's OK - nothing special, quiet. Lots of 20- and 30-somethings, older people. Not too many families with children.
04-05-2009, 08:56 PM
what ViralMD said, and lots & lots of bars and low-to-mid range eateries. very bland area.
04-05-2009, 10:04 PM
 
508 posts, read 1,967,013 times
Thanks for the info. She just had a few more questions. Here goes..

Are your neighbors friendly? Do people talk to each other in the stores, bars, etc? Or do people just kind of keep to themselves?

Where do you do your food shopping? And are there a lot restaurants? Or do you have to walk over to Gramercy or Chelsea for that sort of thing?

Last edited by vitalove; 04-05-2009 at 10:21 PM..
04-06-2009, 12:29 AM
 
70 posts, read 248,806 times
People are young. More 20 somethings than 30 somethings. A lot of rich kids just out of college, but not the rowdy Hoboken type. People keep to themselves for the most part (I think this is true for most of NYC). The last time I was there there was a Food Emporium and a Gristede's on 31st and 3rd. There are tons of restaurants there, as is true for most parts of NYC. It's a great, central location, and one of the cheaper parts of Manhattan in between the financial district and Harlem. It's not a trendy place, but it has plenty of good things going for it, including its proximity to the East Village --probably the coolest neighborhood around.

Also, while it's centrally located, only the 6 train services it (www.mta.info), so I'd only move there if this person's job is within walking distance or somewhere on the East Side of Manhattan.
04-06-2009, 10:26 AM
 
4,036 posts, read 9,099,733 times
Originally Posted by vitalove
Are your neighbors friendly? Do people talk to each other in the stores, bars, etc? Or do people just kind of keep to themselves?
New Yorkers talk to each other in places that are intended to be social, like a bar, the dog-run in a park, coffee shops, etc. We generally don't chat to strangers in the grocery store, as happens in smaller towns. It's not that we're unfriendly, it's just that we tend to be in a hurry and compartmentalize our activities. We have places to be social and other places are purely about function/business.

We have so many types of public spaces that we can use them in different ways. In a small town or a car-centered suburb, the grocery store or the post office is sometimes the only public space.
04-06-2009, 10:30 AM
 
821 posts, read 2,510,860 times
I've been living in Kips Bay for a couple of years now, and am ready to move on. I agree that it is a bland, sterile area. The shopping is practically non-existant. You'll have six dry-cleaners in a two block radius. But no interesting shops. And if you want to buy something as simple as towels or linens, you have to venture out of the neighborhood. Parts of this neighborhood are run-down, but on the plus side, it still feels safe, even late at night.

I can't really comment on Murray Hill proper. But from what I've seen, it is nicer, generally more upscale, than Kips Bay.
04-06-2009, 01:00 PM
 
4,036 posts, read 9,099,733 times
It's (comparatively) affordable because it's boring. You pay a premium to live in a neighborhood with lots of restaurants and shops.

The trick is being close to the 6 train. When I first moved to the city I lived at Park and 35th. It was very dull (compared to the East Village, where I live now) but being close to the train was useful.

To me, the real problem was the 20-something-frat-boy-turned-banker crowd. That's just not my scene so I felt out of place.

However, unless you have a million dollars to spend, living in Manhattan is all about compromise. Murray Hill/Kips Bay is about proximity, not amenities.
04-06-2009, 01:19 PM
 
9,845 posts, read 22,540,356 times
Originally Posted by vitalove
I have a friend who isn't from Manhattan but is looking to relocate to this area in Manhattan. She wanted to know what the vibe was like in the area, as far as residents. While I'm familiar with the area, I have never lived in this area and I don't want to tell her the wrong thing.

We've already heard some conflicting things. Some have said the area is great, while others have said that the vibe was "weird."

Any thoughts? I wanted to know the real deal from my fellow City Data posters. TIA.
The vibe is very yuppy, and yeah kinda sterile.
04-06-2009, 02:50 PM
 
508 posts, read 1,967,013 times
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc
New Yorkers talk to each other in places that are intended to be social, like a bar, the dog-run in a park, coffee shops, etc. We generally don't chat to strangers in the grocery store, as happens in smaller towns. It's not that we're unfriendly, it's just that we tend to be in a hurry and compartmentalize our activities. We have places to be social and other places are purely about function/business.

We have so many types of public spaces that we can use them in different ways. In a small town or a car-centered suburb, the grocery store or the post office is sometimes the only public space.
Thanks but I am a NY'er and so is she. You are absolutely correct on your assessment.

However the question was asked because you know how some neighborhoods are generally more friendly than others. (See our current thread on Park Slope, just saying.) I think it was more if the grocer or shop keeper sees you come into the store often and knows you live in the neighborhood and will speak or chat. In some nabes they don't do this at all. So I think that's why she wanted to know.
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